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Posts Tagged ‘Work’

Job Listings By College Degree

November 8, 2010 Leave a comment

jobs by college degree
Have you recently received your college degree, only to wonder what kind of jobs you are now qualified for? Or even worse, not sure if you even want to work in a job that your college degree dictates you go into? The good news is that certain degrees often open doors to many positions that you may never have even thought of.

Try using the links below to search job listings that are appropriate for your respective degree:

Accounting Degree Jobs
Biology Degree Jobs
Business Administration Degree Jobs
Business Finance Degree Jobs
Business Management Degree Jobs
Communications Degree Jobs
Computer Science Degree Jobs
Criminal Justice Degree Jobs
Computer Science Degree Jobs
Economics Degree Jobs
Engineering Degree Jobs
English Degree Jobs
Health Science Degree Jobs
History Degree Jobs
International Relations Degree Jobs
Law Degree Jobs
Liberal Arts Degree Jobs
Marketing Degree Jobs
Math Degree Jobs
Political Science Degree Jobs
Psychology Degree Jobs
Sociology Degree Jobs
Teaching Jobs

No Degree Necessary Jobs
College Degree Jobs
Associate Degree Jobs
Bachelors Degree Jobs
Masters Degree Jobs

Good luck with your job search!

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7 Questions you MUST ASK in your job interview

April 28, 2010 1 comment

    One of the top reasons given for not hiring a job candidate is that they didn’t ask enough (or any) questions in the job interview. This is absolutely crucial for so many reasons:

  • It demonstrates an interest in the position and company,
  • It engages the interviewer, and
  • Basic psychology says that if you can get the other person to talk about themselves they will end up liking you more.

    What is the biggest difficulty that others have had in this position?
    This will give you an idea of the company’s pain point at this position – use this to your advantage during follow-up interviews (or a thank-you letter if this will be the only interview).

    What are the top three priorities that you would like to see accomplished by someone in this position?
    If you don’t know what the main objectives of the position are then you don’t really know if the position is a fit for you. Asking this question will demonstrate that you really want to find out if the position is a good fit…which will separate you from those that are just looking for any short-term job to pay the bills.

    What are the advancement opportunities for a person who is successful in this position?
    This demonstrates that you are ambitious and focused on long-term growth within the company. It’s also good information for you to know to make sure that the company is a fit for your short and long-term objectives for your career.

    What are this company’s short-term goals?
    What are this company’s long-term goals?

    These questions not only demonstrate an interest in the company, but also will help you decide if the company is a good fit for you.

    What do you see as the biggest challenges in meeting these goals?
    This demonstrates that you are a problem solver. The first step in problem solving is to identify the main challenge. Unless you’re interviewing with Google, the company will definitely have problems and challenges.

    I noticed on your website that your mission statement is (summarize company’s mission); how is this mission statement significant in today’s economy?
    No hiring manager got to where they’re at without being passionate about the company’s mission statement. Get the interviewer to open up and talk about something that they are passionate about, and you will have them instantly engaged for the rest of the interview. In addition, there’s a story behind every mission statement, so it’s always good to hear this from the managers that truly believe in it.

    Obviously feel free to alter these accordingly. Also, this may sound obvious, but add questions that come to mind based on their answers. This shows active listening and will turn the experience into more of a conversation than an interview. If you have a bigger problem answering questions than asking them, then make sure to check out 3 words that will help you answer any job interview question.

    Do you have a story about a question that you asked in a job interview that you wish you hadn’t? Please leave a comment below with your story.

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How to steal your boss’ job

April 21, 2010 Leave a comment

Ahh, I'm also gonna need you to go ahead and come in on Sunday, too

    There’s a trait that is becoming more and more of a buzzword when evaluating talent within today’s companies. This term is used to define a summation of traits that are sought after at every level in a successful company: hiring managers look for it in the initial job interviews while their supervisors look for it in them to determine their promotability (yes, it’s really a word…I double-checked).

    This term is Executive Presence. Know these characteristics and follow these steps to develop them and in no time you’ll be expensing thousand-dollar lunches and using the good toilet paper in the executive washroom.

    Credibility

    How to accomplish it: Position yourself as an expert and someone with integrity. Positioning yourself as an expert is all about personal branding. Pick a topic that is relevant to your field. Set up several daily Google Alerts using keywords for this topic (ie. If you want to position yourself as an expert on social media marketing, you will want to use keywords like “Twitter Marketing Techniques”). Set aside 15-20 minutes per day to skim these articles that are delivered to your email so that you are knowledgeable on the best practices and also so that you constantly have your finger on the pulse of up-to-the-minute happenings in your field.

    To establish integrity you must know the company’s mission statement. This mission statement should be the first thing you consider before every major decision. If you’re interviewing for a job, weaving the company’s mission statement into one of your answers is brown-nosing at its finest…although I don’t suggest this unless you have built a little rapport first, otherwise you may end up coming off as a total kiss-ass.

    Communication

    How to accomplish it: Effective communication is about engaging people. First and foremost, smile and make eye contact. Whether you’re interviewing for a job or just interacting with supervisors or colleagues, ask people what they think about something and why. Be genuine and listen to their answer though…I’ve found that just about everyone has a unique and interesting opinion if you just ask. Asking someone’s opinion is absolutely the easiest way to engage someone. If you’d like more great tips on how to engage someone in an interview, read 3 words that will help you answer any job interview question.

    Confidence

    How to accomplish it: My best advice is that you truly must believe that the only power that someone has over you is the power that you are giving them. If you are in a job interview, you must realize that it is just as much about you determining if a company is right for you, as it is for the interviewer determining if you are the proper fit for them. If you aren’t asking thought-provoking questions in your interview than you are not only doing a disservice to yourself but also not engaging the interviewer properly (not to mention that stumping the interviewer with a question is the easiest way to regain power if you feel that it is falling out of balance).

    Comfortable getting out of your comfort zone

    How to accomplish it: Easy – do things that take you out of your comfort zone. You’re faced with opportunities to do this on a daily basis, but unless you start taking these chances you will always have anxiety about it. The more you do this, the more you will desensitize yourself for this situation for when it really counts.

    Companies are looking for these traits more and more everyday…so start working on these things now or else you may find yourself working at Initech on Sundays.




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Lighter Side: Job search tips from an unemployed Stormtrooper [video]

April 15, 2010 1 comment




    Sometimes you have to look outside-the-box in order to find useful job search advice. Get some tips from this Stormtrooper’s job search, or at the very least a few laughs.







    After a 3-year absence, the unemployed Stormtrooper revises his résumé and resumes his search for a new job:













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How March Madness can help YOU land a job

March 24, 2010 1 comment


    My bracket is busted!  How often have you heard this?  The truth is, unless you have Utah State defeating San Diego State for the championship like one of my colleagues, it’s still anyone’s game (sorry David).  But even if you haven’t filled out a bracket, you can still learn some very important life lessons from the tournament, including tips you can use to land a job.


    What you did during the regular season doesn’t matter.  Analysts often refer to a team’s regular season performance as their résumé.  And if this is the case, then the tournament is the job interview.  It always boggles my mind when I hear people say that they won’t get a job because they’re not qualified enough.  This self-defeatist attitude is truly your biggest obstacle.  Similar to March Madness, your résumé is just to get you in…what happens after that is entirely up to you.


    The best team on paper doesn’t always win.  Every college basketball fan knows that any team can win under the right circumstances (hence the “Madness” in March Madness).  If your experience is good enough to get you the job interview, then you have the same opportunity to get the job.  Underdogs win all the time, and they use the following tactics to increase their odds.


    Preparation is paramount.  Teams prepare for their games by studying tapes of past games.  Think of the internet as your tapes – research the company and interviewer by reviewing the company’s website, searching news articles and press releases, and cyber-stalking them on LinkedIn.


    Develop a solid game plan.  Strategize by preparing questions to ask in a job interview.  Hiring managers want to see that you are knowledgeable about their company, but also that you are eager to learn more.  Know the company’s mission statement (find it in the “About Us” section of their website), and ask them about its significance…no hiring manager has gotten to where they are without being passionate about their company’s mission statement.


    Follow through to the finish.  How many times have you seen a team take a lead into the closing minutes, only to collapse at the last possible moment and lose the game?  This is because that team lacks follow-through: the ability to play with the same intensity for every second until the game is over.  You should demonstrate your follow-through by sending a thank-you letter soon after the interview.  I suggest mailing a hand-written note…it’s more personal and will really set you apart from the crowd.  Check out this helpful article for other thank-you letter tips.


    For other tips on landing a job, check out my past posts:


    What team do you think is going to win the whole thing?  Leave a comment below.  I personally have Ohio State winning the whole thing…but anything can happen.


    Kris Alban


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The Power of Contrarian Thinking

February 25, 2010 1 comment

A few years ago I had the opportunity to move to NYC and work as an equity trader.  While this experience proved brief and unsuccessful, it did make me realize two very important things:

  • Living in Southern California for close to a decade has rendered me unfit to survive in sub 50-degree weather, and
  • Contrarian thinking is extremely valuable, but is rarely taught in college.

A contrarian is one who thinks or acts in a way contrary to the popular opinion.  In terms of investing, acting on contrarian thinking can be very profitable or very costly…but it is always important to at least consider the contrarian point-of-view.  I first learned this lesson as I witnessed experienced equity traders stockpiling (pun intended) Apple shares as the price was plummeting due to rumors circulating on the internet about Steve Jobs’ health.  While the masses (including myself) panicked and sold their stock, contrarian thinkers saw this as an opportunity to acquire a valuable stock at a steep discount.

Unfortunately, this type of thinking certainly didn’t help me out as an investor, but it has proven invaluable in other aspects of life.  Since this experience I have learned to always look for opportunity when others only see problems.  Some examples of this:

  • Discount Buying

Similar to buying a stock when its price goes down, you can save a lot of money if you are buying when everyone else is selling.  Because of all the recent recalls, you can get an amazing deal on a Toyota right now (although I legally can’t advise buying one because I could be held responsible if you blow-up).  Get your snowboard and winter jacket in the spring… buy your board shorts and bikinis in the winter…and if you’re really a true Boston fan, purchase your Patriots/Red Sox apparel any other time than during the playoffs!

  • Getting a Job

Anyone that has attempted to look for any type of job in the past year has certainly noticed that your résumé just doesn’t get noticed at the same frequency that it used to.  Being on the other side of things I now understand why.  Just posting for a part-time position can flood an employer with close to 1,000 applicants!  Not to mention that almost every cover letter submitted was developed according to the “textbook” way that is taught in school.  The applicants that got interviews and eventually got jobs with us were the ones that took a risk with their cover letters and did something different.

  • Entrepreneurship

It may not exactly be contrarian thinking, but I consider it similar.  The most successful entrepreneurs don’t view problems the same way that everyone else does… they see opportunity.  For example, instead of complaining about taking the time to call voicemail and listen to the message (I can’t be the only one that does this) James Siminoff started PhoneTag, a product that converts your voicemail to text and sends a text message to your phone.  Another example of this is the “It’s My Solo Cup” invention.  For years I have been annoyed every time I put my Solo cup down on a table only to look down a minute later and see seven completely indistinguishable red solo cups sitting on the same table.  Recently Solo released a cup with a panel attached that allowed you to scratch your name onto it.  Absolutely brilliant…but it really didn’t take a genius to come up with that one.

In conclusion, contrarian thinking is something that is easier said than done.  It either takes a lot of practice, or in my case several bad equity trades that end up costing you a lot of money.  But if you start thinking this way now, it can end up creating a lot of opportunities for you in the future.

– Kris Alban

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